Cosmonauts use snowy environment as part of survival training

Cosmonauts use snowy environment as part of survival training

(31 Jan 2012)
1. Mid of spacecraft capsule in snowy woods, simulating a landing in the wild and crew having to survive in harsh conditions
2. Close-up of word (Russian) “Russia” and Russian flag on the spacecraft
3. Wide of two men carrying log
4. Mid of trees and sun rays through branches
5. Mid of man chopping log
6. Close-up log being chopped
7. Mid of men storing logs under tent
8. Wide of trees
9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Christopher Cassidy, NASA astronaut who has been on one space flight:
“No, it’s very important. You need to know how to survive in any condition that you land in and prepare a place to do it with your crew. And in the woods like this it’s really� I’m having a great time actually. Food is good, the chai (tea) is good, the wood burns warmly, you can’t beat it.”
10. Close-up burning wood
11. Mid of men carrying log inside their tent, pan left
12. Wide of smoke rising
13. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Pavel Vinogradov, Russian cosmonaut who has been on two space flights:
“We are supposed to be found within 72 hours (after landing), so that’s two to three days.” (you have to survive)
(Reporter’s question: “What do you need to do first?”)
“First of all, you have to notify everyone about yourself, we have radio devices, we have navigation, we have to tell everyone where we are so that we can be found faster. And after that if the conditions are like this, if it’s minus 20, then of course the first thing you need is fire, and you need to change your clothes to suit the weather. And that’s how to survive.”
14. Mid of team of astronauts, fire in the background
15. Wide of astronauts speaking to media
16. Wide of trees
17. Mid of winter clothes, pull out, man showing thick winter clothes
18. Mid of man showing survival gear
19. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Alexander German, head of extreme conditions preparation department at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonauts Preparation Centre:
“After the landing, a cosmonaut is supposed to be ready to survive and stay in good health in extreme conditions in every possible climate and geography zone, because the landing can happen according to schedule and at the planned site, but for some reason the rescuers can fail to locate the landing vehicle or cannot get to it. We had this happening a few times. And during this time, a cosmonaut must be prepared to survive in good health.”
20. Wide of tent
21. Close-up smoke flare in man’s hand, zoom out
STORYLINE:
The future members of the International Space Station (ISS) expedition 35/36, who are scheduled to go to the ISS in 2013, spent Tuesday learning to survive in extreme winter conditions at the Star City near Moscow.
Temperatures in the snow fell as low as minus 20 degrees Celsius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit), but spirits were high among the crew of three – American Christopher Cassidy and Russians Pavel Vinogradov and Aleksandr Misurkin.
Cassidy said he was enjoying himself.
“I’m having a great time actually. Food is good, the chai (tea) is good, the wood burns warmly, you can’t beat it,” he said.
Veteran space traveler Pavel Vinogradov explained that the crew was supposed to be able to survive for up to 72 hours after landing in a space capsule, whatever the conditions they may find themselves in.
“First of all, you have to notify everyone about yourself, we have radio devices, we have navigation, we have to tell everyone where we are so that we can be found faster. And after that if the conditions are like this, if it’s minus 20, then of course the first thing you need is fire, and you need to change your clothes to suit the weather. And that’s how to survive,” he said.

You can license this story through AP Archive:
Find out more about AP Archive: